Film Review: Super Troopers 2

The United States of America is surely not the most adorned country in the world right now. Once considered to be the globe’s superpower, has easily been the running and laughing gag to the rest of the world, including its absurd President, peaking violence and of course, its laughable gun control laws. Yet, you would think that the men who make up the Broken Lizard comedy collective would use all of these disheartening issues plaguing the United States, and come up with a comedy farce that would/could redeem the American integrity, or (at the very least), offer some sort of hopeful message wrapped around some poignant and redeemable comedy farce, especially using such iconic and classical culty characters. Instead, the guys behind Broken Lizard bring back the Vermont State Highway Patrol Men in disappointing fashion, after seventeen years of leaving their highly absurd and man-childish antics legacy lingering on the big screen since Super Troopers, with Super Troopers 2.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Review: her

From the moment the screen fills with light, and we come face-to-face with Theodore Twombly (Joaquin Phoenix), his eyes are desolate while his voice is filled with love as he recites the poetically romantic words of Loretta’s letter to her husband of fifty years, Chris. Theodore works for BeautifullyHandwrittenLetters.com, a company established sometime in the near future where people are either too lazy or just mentally incapable of writing their own letters to their loved ones. The irony of her begins (as do so many other films) with someone else’s love story. The trials and tribulations of Theodore’s love story not only mirrors the love we share with others but also portrays our uncontrollable and inexplicable dependence or ‘love’ for technology. In that sense, her becomes part science fiction love story/part docudrama, with a message that is both a parable of the direction human behaviour is headed and a misunderstood, timeless love story for the ages. Either way, her is the most captivating and responsive film of the year, demanding attention with a grueling look at our ability to love and be loved. Continue reading