Film Review: Suicide Squad

In a world where audiences cannot get enough of superheroes, comics and geeking over the impossibly feverish fade of comic book hero’s adapted onto the big screen, DC Comics is trying to cash in on this highly lucrative cinematic craze by developing a feature length feature, and their competition to The Avengers with Suicide SquadYet, if we really look at the bigger picture of Suicide Squad, one can easily see some stark differences, for example; none of the characters are really superheroes but villains; none of the characters presented are really recognizable names, with the exception of The Joker (who isn’t even a member of the squad in the film) and Harley Quinn (who is destined to become a household character by the end of this film, with the help of Margot Robbie of course), and, if not most importantly, assembling a team together, including cast and crew, that couldn’t be more, disassembled.

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The 87th Annual Academy Award Nominations

Today, movie lovers will unite and bask in the glory of the highest honours given to film and cinema. The official announcement of the Academy Awards are today, and for the first time in the history of the Academy, they have announced all categories on a televised programming. This is really exciting stuff because film is finally beginning to be recognized as a collaborative art; one that involves each and every individual, from so many diverse talents, all across the board. Celebrated directors J.J Abrams and Alfonso Cuaron were responsible for announcing all the technical awards, while Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs and actor Chris Pine revealed the higher profile nominations.

So without any further delay, here are the 87th Annual Academy Award Nominations: Continue reading

Film Review: Selma

There are certain people and events throughout history that are so obviously in need of a cinematic treatment, that their absence from the big screen leaves audiences wondering what on earth took so long. Such is the case with the one of the most recognizable and referenced figures in Western society, Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. This larger than life individual whose life and accomplishments are far too grand for a simple studio feature film, has luckily never been subjected to an impoverished movie. Instead, Dr. King is assimilated as a key figure in Ava DeVernay’s re-telling of the events in Selma, Alabama. DeVernay illustrates the movement organized by Dr. King which brought to light the fact that although African American’s (predominantly in the South) had the constitutional right to vote, they had not seen a registered vote cast for over sixty years. Just like the events that unfolded throughout the worldwide broadcasting of Bloody Sunday, the march in Selma was a fair catalyst to the establishment of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, a bill that gave all Americans equal opportunity to exercise their democratic rights.   Continue reading