Film Review: A Private War

There are names that you hear growing up while studying journalism, reagrdless of the specific area or field of journalism you decide to station yourself in. In entertainment journalism, although hardly ever really dangerous (with the exception of some volatile celebrities), the truth matters almost as much as our opinion, after all, film is art; and art is as objective as, well, perhaps the most objective thing in the world. Yet, studying journalism in any field, its hard not to come across the name of Marie Colvin, one of, if not the most celebrated war correspondent in the world.  Continue reading

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Film Review: Steve Jobs

It is often stated that the line between insanity and genius is measured only by success. When discussion turns to that of one’s genius, we find it difficult not to equate that genius with some level of insanity. This is especially true when that discussion focuses on Steve Jobs, the man behind machines that allows us to hold the world in the palm of our hand. Steve Jobs is not simply a film, but is an experience of perception; of history; and of a household name. Continue reading

TIFF40 2015: The Danish Girl

Tom Hooper seems to be the period piece go-to director for by-the-numbers Oscar films. After the immense success of the little indie that could The King’s Speech gaining massive momentum at TIFF in 2010going on to win the coveted Best Picture Oscar; then the grand and highly ambitious Les Miserables, Hooper seemed to have crafted a career out of production rich designs, strong performances and historically relevant social issues in his films. With the addition of Eddie Redmayne, fresh off his Oscar winning role in last year’s The Theory of Everything, Hooper’s newest The Danish Girl was expected to come out a clear winner. Sadly, The Danish Girl is a confused, highly theatrical and poorly constructed transparent film with laughable dialogue between its two leads Redmayne and rising star Alicia Vikander.  Continue reading

TIFF40 2015 Film Review: Dheepan

Toronto–One of the many advantages to watching films being premiered at film festivals is hearing a little bit of back story and reasoning as to how and why they are made. At the North American premiere of this year’s Palme D’Or winner Dheepan, held in the elegant Elgin Theatre in the heart of Toronto, acclaimed writer/director Jacques Audiard told the audience, “I wanted to make a film that would allow you to never look at those guys selling you roses at your dinner tables again”. Perhaps one of the best moments for the film altogether, Dheepan is one story that will surely change your perception of those gentlemen forever; however not necessarily in the most realistic or believable ways.  Continue reading

Film Review: Yves Saint Laurent

Becoming a trend-setter in the fashion industry can be quite the challenge, but making a fashion movie with some cinematic and historical merit is the real challenge many have been willing to accept, and have failed miserably. Even though there are so many irreplaceable names within fashion with such interesting stories to tell (Dior, Arden, Versace, Ford, Varvatos, Gucci and Chanel to name a few), director Jalil Lespert chooses Yves Saint Laurent; one of the few fashion icons to have his pieces of high fashion and considerably iconic art pieces displayed in museums and prestigious art galleries around the world. Yet, with Yves Saint Laurentwe aren’t quite sure if that is simply enough for a biopic of this stature. Continue reading