TIFF 16: Infinite Views

Here it is, it is once again time and amongst us again, the Toronto International Film Festival, or, more famously referred to as, TIFF. TIFF or TIFF16 if you are hash tagging anything this year, is the 41st Year of the Toronto International Film Festival, and we couldn’t be happier to share our third year covering the fest. This year more than every year, we are covering more films, have some big name interviews coming your way and have a ton of fun, exciting and new content for all our readers.  Continue reading

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Film Review: Selma

There are certain people and events throughout history that are so obviously in need of a cinematic treatment, that their absence from the big screen leaves audiences wondering what on earth took so long. Such is the case with the one of the most recognizable and referenced figures in Western society, Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. This larger than life individual whose life and accomplishments are far too grand for a simple studio feature film, has luckily never been subjected to an impoverished movie. Instead, Dr. King is assimilated as a key figure in Ava DeVernay’s re-telling of the events in Selma, Alabama. DeVernay illustrates the movement organized by Dr. King which brought to light the fact that although African American’s (predominantly in the South) had the constitutional right to vote, they had not seen a registered vote cast for over sixty years. Just like the events that unfolded throughout the worldwide broadcasting of Bloody Sunday, the march in Selma was a fair catalyst to the establishment of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, a bill that gave all Americans equal opportunity to exercise their democratic rights.   Continue reading

The BEST and WORST Films of 2014…Thus Far

Starting from scratch never tasted so good. Continue reading

Film Review: A Million Ways To Die In The West

Death is undoubtedly the strongest motif in Seth MacFarlane’s newest live-action feature film A Million Ways To Die In the West. And like the motif itself, one cannot help but be bored to death with a film, that started off as an inside joke between friends (MacFarlane as well as his co-writers Alec Sulkin and Wellesley Wild), and develops into a perfectly displayed example of what happens when people who have too much money are given the freedom to make any piece of cow dung they want.  Continue reading