Film Review: Isle of Dogs

Audiences around the world go to see a Wes Anderson film for many reasons; imagination, creativity, wonder and most of all, amazement. A man who has crafted and added to, not only a branch of the film industry within the independent market, but an individual who arguable has his own genre of film, proves with his latest that you are able to make an independent success, commercial darling and fading animation style feature film revolutionary. After eight feature films which enrich the medium as a whole, Wes Anderson delved, for a second time, into the stop-motion foray with his ninth future film, and quite possibly his best yet with Isle of Dogs Continue reading

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Film Review: The Overnight

The notion play-date is one that is easily understandable in the world of children. Play-dates imply when children are taken to specific locations, play, interact, laugh, cry and then, eventually go home to rest for the next day of their exciting and fruitful lives. The terms and conditions of the play-date for adults are still, for the most part, under strict and heavy analysis and consideration. The Overnight is a film that looks to push the boundaries of adult play-dates, often times with unexpected, shocking, and completely bewildering results.

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Review: The Grand Budapest Hotel

You see, there are still faint glimmers of civilization left in this barbaric slaughter house that was once known as humanity”.  If there was ever a quote to sum up the films of Wes Anderson, this would be high on the list. Highly inventive, absurd, and at times, narratively incoherent, Anderson’s eighth feature film is a grand, accommodating feature whose self is probably not as grand as the cast it has rounded out.

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Review: Saving Mr. Banks

The fact that I have never seen Mary Poppins should not compromise the extent of happiness that I experienced as a youngster. Yes, it may seem a bit bizarre that I never indulged in Julie Andrew’s Oscar winning performance and one of the most iconic screen roles of all time, but the fact of the matter is, Mary Poppins is a definite Disney film classic whether or not I have seen it. And although I may be in the minority of film critics who have never had the opportunity to see Poppins, I can assure you that it would have not changed my mind on the overall result of John Lee Hancock‘s cookie-cutter retelling film Saving Mr. Banks. Formulaic, emotionally manipulating and typical in Disney’s ugly duckling to sparkling swan narrative arc, Mr.Banks needs a lot more saving than it thinks.  Continue reading