The 90th Academy Awards: Full Nomination List

While I wake up super early every day of my life for work, there is something special about waking up early on the official day of Oscar nominations!  Continue reading


Film Review: Wilson

Have you ever met a person that was always so negative; a complete narcissist; a complete nut case who goes about doing all the wrong things, and makes the worst life choices ever? Well, if you do know a person like that and want to compare them to someone else as neurotic, Wilson is the movie for you. Woody Harrelson plays the titular title character with as much pizzazz and life as possible while being an inherently bleak as can be. Continue reading

Film Review: War on Everyone

Philosopher Thomas Hobbes foretold a future “War of All Against All” in his book Leviathan, published in 1651. In his political/philosophical novel, he wrote his masterpiece during the English Civil War, which occurred from 1642-1651, arguing that a state of sovereignty is the only which way a body of politics can operate, without interference for third party or outside sources and individuals. His “War of All Against All” is an idea that was derived from the ‘state of nature argument’, where government can only be successful if it is strong, undivided and unified. Continue reading


Film Review: Miss Sloane

If you haven’t figured it out already, The Newsroom, the cancelled and highly underwetched, underrated, and heavily missed HBO Dramatic series from the ingenious Aaron Sorkin is absolutely one of my all-time favourite television shows ever created. Given the quip dialogue, snappy political, social and cultural references, not to miss, its absolutely miraculous comedic timing and concurrent content, it is not only one of the best shows to ever premiere on television, but also a necessary viewing. Now if you’re thinking, why in the heck am I mentioning a television show that has nothing to do with the current movie in review, the answer is…everything! Continue reading


TIFF40 2015 Film Review: A Tale of Love and Darkness

“It’s better to be sensitive than to be honest”. 

It is no surprise that first time writer/director Natalie Portman is taking a Pro-Jewish stance in her newest film A Tale of Love and Darkness. A celebrated novel by one of, if not the most prolific novelists hailing from Israel, Amos Oz; a last name that literally translates to “hope” in Hebrew. Oz is a novelist whose book serves as a large and hopeful story towards conflict flooding the Middle East. Sadly for Portman, whose keen eye and collaboration with many talented directors, has allowed her to visually over-stylize her film with beauty and tones of dark and tragically elegant glimpses, without much of a handle on narrative and storytelling.  Continue reading