Film Review: Hardcore Henry

Enjoy video games? POV first-person shooters? Action movies? Unbelievable movie-going experiences?  Being a part of something completely different and revolutionary for the cinematic art medium? Having a good time? A really really good time? Then Hardcore Henry is undoubtedly a movie for you.  Continue reading

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Film Review: The Hateful Eight

Watching a Tarantino film is a cinematic experience, better yet, a right of movie-passage; an experience that may not be as recognizable or appreciated now by the vast majority, but can surely be pointed out and appreciated by a fine few who can find similarities and influences with some of the last great auteurs and great directors of the past. And yet, like his films, Tarantino intended to present his sly and ultra-violent eighth film in the most roadshow way possible; with an overture, intermission and in 70mm no less. Maybe your wondering, after eight films, has Tarantino out done himself, especially after the exceptional critical and commercial praise of Django Unchained, for which he won an Academy Award in the Original Screenplay category? The answer my friends is, as Samuel L. Jackson so coyly says within the first lines of the film, “Got room for one more?”, cause Tarantino ain’t going anywhere yet! Continue reading

Film Review: Selma

There are certain people and events throughout history that are so obviously in need of a cinematic treatment, that their absence from the big screen leaves audiences wondering what on earth took so long. Such is the case with the one of the most recognizable and referenced figures in Western society, Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. This larger than life individual whose life and accomplishments are far too grand for a simple studio feature film, has luckily never been subjected to an impoverished movie. Instead, Dr. King is assimilated as a key figure in Ava DeVernay’s re-telling of the events in Selma, Alabama. DeVernay illustrates the movement organized by Dr. King which brought to light the fact that although African American’s (predominantly in the South) had the constitutional right to vote, they had not seen a registered vote cast for over sixty years. Just like the events that unfolded throughout the worldwide broadcasting of Bloody Sunday, the march in Selma was a fair catalyst to the establishment of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, a bill that gave all Americans equal opportunity to exercise their democratic rights.   Continue reading